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Traditions and Trajectories of Love:
The Sixth International Conference on Popular Romance

June 23-25, 2016
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Keynote speakers: Jayashree Kamble and Amira Jarmakani

Call for Papers:
What has the story of love been? Where is it headed? How does popular culture help shape the experience of romantic love—and how has popular romance culture been changed, in its turn, by broader social, political, economic, and technological developments?

campussummer_big For its sixth international conference, held at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, the International Association for the Study of Popular Romance calls for papers on romantic love and its representations in popular media, now and in the past, from anywhere in the world.

Open to talks on any relevant topic or text, we define “popular romance culture” broadly to include not only fictional forms (novels, films, TV shows, pop music, fan fiction, popular poetry, etc.), but also didactic material (advice columns, dating manuals, newspaper debates about love or marriage “in crisis”), and the “ideal-typical” representations deployed by advertising.

This year, we are particularly interested in papers on traditions of love and its popular representations (local and regional traditions, historical traditions, religious traditions, etc.), on the trajectories that carry popular romance culture across boundaries of region, period, genre, or medium, and on individual instances of popular romance culture which might illuminate those broader traditions and trajectories. We are eager to receive proposals on older forms of popular romance (classical, medieval, early modern, etc.) and on love and its representations in Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Latin American popular cultures. We would also encourage proposals on popular romance culture in the classroom and in libraries: course designs, questions of pedagogy, archival collections and concerns, etc.

campusSpringThis multi-disciplinary conference welcomes searching questions about romantic love’s nature, history, politics, and lived experience that have been raised by emerging interdisciplinary fields such as Relationship Science, Love Studies, and the History of Emotions, as well as by history, anthropology, literary studies, psychology, sociology, neurobiology, queer theory, and cultural studies. We also invite proposals from romance authors, industry professionals, and independent scholars.